A sad goodbye

Kailyn Lamb
klamb@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 1/8/20

It is my sad duty to inform you that this is my last issue as the editor of Washington Park Profile. At the start of next year I will be moving to Tennessee. As I was driving through Denver last …

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A sad goodbye

Posted

It is my sad duty to inform you that this is my last issue as the editor of Washington Park Profile. At the start of next year I will be moving to Tennessee.

As I was driving through Denver last month to find the inspiration to write this column, I found myself passing through apartment lined streets near the Capitol building, and staring at the huge display of Christmas lights on the City and County Building.

Learning the history behind that display was probably one of my favorite stories I wrote during my tenure here at Colorado Community Media. John Malpiede, Denver’s head electrician at the time, began stringing his own lights together in 1917. Over the years, his displays grew, becoming the huge light display we see today.

For more information on that story, go to https://washparkprofile.com/stories/let-there-be-light,274867.

To me, that story is the epitome of community news. The Christmas lights on the City and County building are something we see every year, but we may not know the background of why or how they got there.

In the nearly two years that I have been the editor here, I have learned so much more about Denver. I’ve come across people who work hard at bringing more diverse voices to the table when talking about how we want this city to grow. I’ve worked with nonprofits advocating for people and getting them back on their feet permanently. I’ve interviewed women who have faced the most awful traumas, and still found ways to grow and make their lives better.

Finding stories in the Denver neighborhoods has never been a challenge for me. There’s always events or projects that show just how many different ways this community comes together. Meeting people and hearing about the different ways they impact the community is the most inspiring thing about this job.

To community members who have emailed me about potential stories or connected me with others to write about, I am deeply grateful. I hope the connections I have made as the editor here will follow me for many years to come.

To the countless people I have interviewed over the past two years, I am even more indebted. Your words helped me fill the pages of these community papers with information that I hope helped neighbors to better connect with the neighborhoods they live in.

And so I am signing off for now. I sincerely enjoyed writing for you over the past two years, and I hope that you all continue to read with our new editor in the future.

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